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Neighborhood Safety


Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) in NEIGHBORHOODS, RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL SETTINGS:


Often the safety measures taken in subdivision communities, such as high fences and

video-monitored gates, can have a negative instead of positive effect on residents. The

presence of security devices implies a need for them. CPTED guidelines, when applied to neighborhoods, can create a safer environment without the use of the more common,

intimidating methods. For instance, streets designed with gateway treatments, roundabouts, speed bumps, and other "traffic calming" devices establish territories

and discourage speeding and cut through traffic. And by keeping public areas

observable, you are telling potential offenders that they should think twice before committing a crime. Criminals prefer low-risk situations, and public visibility increases the chances a perpetrator will be caught. These measures are simple, inexpensive to

implement, and will have a much more positive effect on residents than gates and bars.




This Neighborhood Association information is a guide to assist you. By no means, these suggestions are complete set of rules that must be followed. It is merely a starting point with helpful information to effectively organize, mediate and avoid escalating a situation with your neighbor(s). Legal counsel is recommended to fit the unique needs of your city ordinance, neighborhood association and/or issues with your neighbor.

No matter how close or how far we live from each other, there are going to be fights between neighbors. Neighboring farmers may fight over their boundary line or animals getting into the wrong field! Neighbors in an apartment complex could fight over music that is too loud at night or cigarette smoke that triggers asthma. Neighbors on a city block could fight over suspected drug activity.....high foot traffic, loitering, graffiti, etc.

We call these behaviors a nuisance. They may be covered by state and local law. What is a Nuisance? A public nuisance, according to state law, is anything that is:

• Injurious to health

• Indecent to the senses

• Unlawfully impeding free use of the streets

• Obstructing free use of property so as to interfere with the comfortable enjoyment of life or property


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