Teach Kindness logo

There are never enough words to thank all of the devoted teachers who spend countless hours shaping the young minds of our community. To show our appreciation, the Humane Education Department at Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control is waiving the adoption fee of all Guinea Pigs at its Teach Kindness adoption event. Public, private and pre-school teachers can come to the shelter on May 18th between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. to learn more about the Humane Education programs offered at the shelter and pick out their new fury family member free of charge. 

New to Guinea Pigs? No problem! We will provide you with everything you'll need to know about how to care for your new family member. We'll also have fun enrichment ideas you can make at home or with your students. During our Teach Kindness event, teachers will be provided with lesson plans, videos and other materials about their adoption experience that can be used in their classrooms! 

Regular adoption process still applies. Adoptions will be first come, first serve until all available Guinea Pigs find loving homes. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is eligible for a free pet?

  • Any public school teacherTeach Kindness 2019
  • Any private school teacher
  • Any pre-school teacher

What type of educator identification should I present?

  • Employee photo ID
  • Pay stub or name badge imprinted with school name or county AND a state issued photo ID

Which pets are available to educators?

  • Right now we are just offering waived adoption fees for Guinea Pigs. 

I have another question; how do I find the answer?

  • Please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any other questions!

Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control is joining animal shelters across North America to save the lives of shelter cats and ensure every single cat in a North American shelter gets exactly the help they need. It's all part the Million Cat Challenge - a joint campaign of the Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Florida and the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program.

The Million Cat Challenge is based on five key initiatives that offer every shelter, in every community, practical choices to reduce euthanasia and increase live outcomes for shelter cats.

 

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Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control, along with its coalition partners, has made great strides in saving the lives of cats in our community. In 2010, four years before the Community Cat program was implemented, the live release rate of cats was just 13 percent. Now that’s no longer the case thanks to implementing Community Cats, our growing adoption program and innovative programming. In 2018, 70 percent of all the cats that came through the shelter’s doors were returned to their owners, adopted, transferred to rescue partners or were returned to their neighborhood as a Community Cat.

“Of the over 5,000 cats we see, a quarter of them are surrendered to us by their owners,” Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control director Amy-Jo Sites said.  “ We have been working on creating a program to assist pet owners keep them in their homes. Our focus is to make sure cats in our care are not euthanized because we don’t have enough space.  We have been creating new relationships with businesses and other shelters in an effort to ensure we route cats to the program that would best suit their needs. Being part of the Million Cat Challenge is more than a slogan; it really is a pledge to save lives. “

"The shelters who have taken the Challenge are leading the way in finding and implementing new approaches to saving cats' lives," said Dr. Kate Hurley, director of the UC Davis program.

About the Million Cat Challenge

The Million Cat Challenge was founded as a shelter-based campaign to save the lives of one million cats in North America over five years. The core strategy of the campaign focuses on five key initiatives that offer every shelter, in every community, practical choices to reduce euthanasia and increase live outcomes for shelter cats. The Challenge launched in 2014 with funding from Maddie's Fund, a national foundation established by Dave and Cheryl Duffield to revolutionize the status and well-being of companion animals. Challenge co-founders Drs. Julie Levy and Kate Hurley are available for interviews. For more information, visit www.millioncatchallenge.org.

FORT WAYNE, IN - Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control continues its efforts to educate the public on ways to prevent dog bites during national Dog Bite Prevention Week April 7-13. 

More than 700 bites to humans were reported to Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control in 2018. About 75 percent of the bites were to adults and 20 percent to children 12 and under. The vast majority of bites are from our own dogs or dogs we are familiar with.    

Education is the first step to preventing bites. Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control’s Humane Education Department works year round to teach pet safety and bite prevention techniques to the public – with a focus on children. In 2018, the Humane Education Department taught the vital safety precautions to more than 2,000 children in our community.

“It’s important to understand that dogs don’t bite out of the blue,” shelter spokesperson Holly Pasquinelli said. “By teaching adults and children in our community a basic understanding of why dogs bite and how to interpret their dogs body language we’re working to keep them safe and keep dogs where they belong – at home with their families.”

Throughout the week Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control will be sharing bite prevention techniques and information on how to read dog body language on its Facebook page HERE

HOW TO AVOID BEING BITTEN BY A DOG

  • Be cautious around dogs you don’t know.
  • NEVER leave a baby or small child alone with a dog.
  • Avoid unfamiliar dogs.  If a dog approaches to sniff you, stand still like a tree. In most cases, the dog will go away when they determine you are not a threat.
  • Don’t pet a dog by reaching through a fence or into a car window.
  • Always ask permission before petting someone’s dog.
  • Don’t run past a dog.  Dogs naturally love to chase and catch things.
  • Never disturb a dog that’s caring for puppies, sleeping or eating.
  • If you are threatened by a dog, remain calm.  Don’t scream or yell.  If you say anything, speak calmly and firmly.  Avoid eye contact.  Try to stay still until the dog leaves, or back away slowly until the dog is out of sight.  Don’t turn and run.
  • If you fall or are knocked to the ground, curl into a ball with your hands over your head and neck.  Protect your face.

PREVENT YOUR DOG FROM BITING

  • Treat your own pets with respect and gentle handling.
  • Don’t force your dog into a situation that might scare them.
  • Socialize your dog or young puppy, so they feel at ease around people and other animals.  Gradually expose your dog to a variety of situations under controlled circumstances; continue that exposure on a regular basis.
  • Don’t allow your dog to be in places where they might feel threatened or be teased.
  • Attend a dog training class. The basic manners “sit,” “stay,” “off,” and “come” can be incorporated into fun activities that build a bond of obedience and trust between pets and people.
  • Avoid highly excitable games like wrestling or tug-of-war.
  • Always use a leash when in public to ensure you are able to control your dog.
  • Keep your dog healthy with yearly vaccinations.  How your dog feels directly affects how they behave.
  • Spay or neuter your pet. Altered dogs are less likely to bite.
  • Don’t chain your dog.  Chaining increases aggression in dogs.

What Should I Do If My Dog Bites Someone?

Even if the bite can be explained (e.g., someone stepped on your dog’s tail), it’s important to take responsibility for your dog’s actions.

Did you know that Indiana law requires a biting animal (dog, cat or ferret) be placed in ten (10) day rabies quarantine even if they are vaccinated?

Many people are hesitant to report bites because they are afraid of the outcome. Once a report is filed, Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control must determine the severity of the bite, where the bite occurred (at home or off property) and how many times the animal has bitten. Those factors will determine whether or not the animal will be placed in the home for the quarantine period or housed at Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control for the ten (10) days required by state law. Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control does not automatically put biting animals to sleep.  Owners that report bites are doing the responsible thing for the safety of other animals and the bite victim(s), human or animal. Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control wants nothing more than for the people and animals to be safe and healthy. Our goal, whenever possible, is to keep your animal at home where it belongs.

 After a bite occurs, the following steps should be taken:

  • Confine your dog away from the scene of the bite.
  • Check on the victim’s condition. Wash wounds with soap and water.  Professional medical advice should be sought.
  • Report the bite.  Call Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control inside the city and the sheriff’s department in the county.
  • Consult your veterinarian for advice about dog behavior that will help prevent similar problems in the future.
  • If someone else’s dog bites you, seek medical treatment, and then call authorities with everything you know about the dog to help animal control officers locate the dog. 

Dogs are wonderful companions.  By acting responsibly, owners not only reduce dog bite injuries, but also enhance the relationship they have with their dogs. For more information about bite prevention programs at the shelter and educational materials click HERE. 

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Director Amy-Jo Sites

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Featured Pets

 

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KLARA A165105

  Journal Gazette

 

pet of the week

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WANE-TV 

 

   

 

Adoption Lobby Hours:

12:00 - 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
12:00 - 6:00 p.m. Wednesday

1st & 3rd Saturday of every month
11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Adoption Office: 260-427-5502

Closed Mondays FOR ADOPTIONS
To submit a pet adoption profile, you must do so 30-minutes before closing to allow sufficient time for processing.


Business Office Hours (lost & found- receiving lobby- citations or other law enforcement concerns):

11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Mon-Fri
CLOSED Saturday & Sunday


Animal Control Officer Assistance
260-427-1244
9am-8pm Monday - Friday
After 8pm, weekend & holidays,
call 260-449-3000

After Hours / immediate officer assistance:
1:00 a.m. - 6:00 a.m. Emergencies
260-449-3000


General Contact Information:
Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control
3020 Hillegas Road
Fort Wayne IN 46808
260-427-1244
After 8 p.m. and on weekends and holidays, call 449-3000 for assistance.
Fax: 260-427-5514